Leba Dinovitz took some stellar pictures.  She was amazing, as was Tzivi D. – the food stylist…. first picture being the delicious delectable chocolate mousse in a chocolate cup. Our Indian Samosa – (Leba D. Photo) always a fan favorite appetizer. 7 Spiced Seared Tuna -(Leba D. photo)  another fantastic appetizer – normally served with a dot of wasabi cream. Always a good time for sushi (Leba D. photo) One of our signature dishes – the zucchini weave with cous cous inside (although sometimes it’s rice, quinua or stuffing – photo by Leba D).

An easy and very Italian appetizer is a caprese salad.  There are only a few ingredients, yet it looks stunning on a plate, smells fantastic and tastes delicious. 1 1/2 pounds High Moisture Mozzarella 1 1/2 pounds Vine ripened tomatoes (or heirloom if you’re willing to splurge) 1/2 bunch Fresh Basil, washed and coarsely chopped 2 teaspoons Coarse Salt (or to taste) 1/4 teaspoon Pepper 2-3 teaspoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil Why did I write high moisture mozzarella you may ask?  Because this is the kind of mozzarella that is delicious and oozing with “juice” and adds to the dish.  However, if you are shopping for your mozzarella at 7Mile, you might not be able to find it.  I was only  able to find “Low Moisture” mozzarella – and this works, too (you can actually make your own relatively easily – if you’d like…

This summer we are having camp Shor!  And as part of the fun activities we do, we do a lot of children friendly recipes (and pre-school crafts – if you know fun ones, let me know).  The following chocolate syrup is easy and delicious.  It’s from the Scharffen Berger’s cookbook (Scharffen Berger is a boutique chocolate – which can be bought at The Chocolate Publishing company, as well as other locations).   It’s a small amount and little hands can do a great job mixing and pouring (and then drinking milk chocolate – it’s a win/win all around). Is this recipe cost effective (i.e. is it cheaper to make than shoprite chocolate syrup?) – I have to work the math out on that one, but it’s better for you (i.e. no corn syrup, and no preservatives).  This recipe keeps about 1 month in the fridge, and is…

Sweet and Good Catering not only catered our wedding, they’ve catered intimate dinner parties in our home as well. Their menu is to die for, a varied and savory mix of ethnic temptations. Every bite is literally saturated with taste, bursting with a new flavor surprise for your palette. The originality and quality of the food offerings is paralleled only by their presentation. Bracha, company owner, is a gourmet genius. I’ve never witnessed such a combination of loving preparation, professionalism, and attention to detail. Until Sweet and Good Catering, it was impossible, to find local catered food that is on par with the quality and ethnic variety of that available in Los Angeles or New York. I love that I can order Cajun, French, Mexican or Moroccan-themed meals, to name a few, and that the food arrives elegantly packaged and easy to serve. Plus, it’s…

One way to perfect a dish is to showcase all 5 “tastes” – salty, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami (which refers to a type of fermented taste).  When you use all 5 tastes this sometimes makes for a delicious “symphony” of flavors, but if the dish is out of balance the flavors could quickly turn into a muddled cacophony instead. I put this recipe together while I was trying to make a very fancy fish course.  I was trying to impress a few special Shabbos guests, and it turned out I was low on fish – I had one can of anchovies in the house.  You might ask, how can you  make 1 can of anchovies stretch for 8 people?  Make it into a dressing!  We had apples and avocados – and then I garnished it with some very thin julienned red pepper and…

Ok, are they really the best doughnuts ever? I’m not sure, but these are amazing.  I’ve made sufganiyot (doughnuts) for years.  And you know what – I can’t make them.  I don’t know why.  I’ve gotten recipes from lots of doughnut makers – people who have great success making doughnuts (I know, because I’ve eaten their doughnuts, and then I say, “can I have your recipe, I have trouble making doughnuts.”  They then give me their recipes and their tips and are very nice about the whole thing and then I still get flat fried dough. It’s very sad. It’s almost like Charlie Brown and the football.  Every year I try again.  And every year I’ve been just a little disappointed – you can’t really be a lot disappointed, because for goodness sakes, we’re still dealing with fried dough with sugar, if you know…

We took a quick trip to Indiana for the first days of Sukkot to visit our friends from Israel.  It is 645 miles from where we live.  And unfortunately, all the words I know to “Gary, Indiana” are “Gary, Indiana, Gary Indiana, Gary Indiana, My home sweet home.”  And well, after about 10 miles of that, I had to try to find other things to sing…. The country is beautiful – the leaves are changing, they’re further along then our leaves were, so we saw lots of oranges, reds, greens and yellows.  When we crossed into Indiana, a big sign proclaims:  “Indiana – childhood home of Lincoln.”  Really?  Come on! Indiana.  I feel disappointed.  I think your state motto could be something stronger -Surely someone famous was born in Indiana – all you got is that Lincoln’s parents carpet bagged through your state?  (I…

Thank you so much to Elisheva Rabinowitz for the opportunity to write this article about some New Year appropriate salads.  Since, we are coming to the New Year and apples are on my mind, we’ll look at a few salad recipes. First of all, you can always add diced apples to whatever salad you would like.  And you say, what?  my apples always turn brown when I do this.  Well, before you add the apples to a salad, put them in a zip lock bag, and add some lemon juice (a squeeze from half a lemon – if you have no lemon, you can use a teaspoon of vinegar to the same end) – shake.  Then you can add the apples without fear from the color brown…  The acidity from the lemon will stop the oxidation process that turns the apple brown (if I…

Are you looking for new and interesting salads – filled with taste and nutrition?  Then consider the Jerusalem Artichoke – neither from Jerusalem nor an artichoke! Despite the misnomer – Jerusalem artichokes (also known as sunchokes) are delicious. They have a nutty, refreshing taste and can be eaten in a variety of ways – raw, boiled, steamed, sauteed, mashed, baked, etc.  They can be substituted for potatoes in recipes (although the sunchoke cooking time is vastly quicker – once you can pierce the sunchoke easily, it is done).   You scrub them clean, no need for peeling.  If you are looking for them in a supermarket – they look very similar to ginger root.  You can find these at SunFresh – the produce market on Reisterstown near Subway.  If you are choosing – you will want to avoid sunchokes that are wrinkled, have soft spots,…

Friday we had to make some lunch, and no one knew what they wanted – we tried many options.  However, sometimes we need something special and fun (and preferably easy).  From our trip to the library we got a Children’s quick and easy cookbook – which has lots of recipes of things I used to eat as a child.  And I remembered fondly my brother and I making our own Cyclops when we needed an afternoon snack.  So, continuing a Markizon tradition – we did the “Cyclops” or the “Egg in a hole”. Ingredients: A teaspoon or so of Butter, Margarine or a spray of cooking spray Bread (the same number of pieces of bread as number of eggs) Egg Take a saute pan or a frying pan and put the butter, margarine or cooking spray in and heat up.  Then take the bread…

We had an amazing Tu B’Shvat Seder – with over 25 fruits and nuts and a few baked delicacies.  First of all – for those people who are Sephardi – you already know about pickling watermelon and lemons – but you can candy a whole lemon – with nothing leftover but the seeds.  See recipe below.  That turned out delicious.  We also poached some pears in wine sauce – yum.  And we made a delicious barley side dish (that went with our meatballs in a dried berry chutney sauce. Candied Lemon 1 large lemon 1 cup sugar 1 cup water Bring a pot of water to boil.  While the water is starting to boil slice the lemon into as thin slices as you can – you should come out with around 15.  If you have a madoline you can use that, or a sharp…

Hello – on this fine Sunday morning we wanted to do something fun and have a special treat.  Nava had made her own ice cream at camp – and so we tried it ourselves.  It is easy and a yummy (relatively) healthy treat.  And we got our new Nikon CoolPix P7000 – like I know what that means, however, we have the camera and we can take pictures.  Uploading seems to be a challenge, so we have pictures, but I can’t show you yet…. Ice Cream Ingredients: 1 cup milk (skim, 1 %, or whole, or cream for that matter) 2 tablespoons sugar (you can reduce this, depending on your preferences) 1/4 teaspoon mint extract (or vanilla, or whatever extract you would like) NOTE: for some mint extracts this ended up being too much.  So start with less – eagle eyed reader SD suggested…

Hooray for Chanukah! Our new cooking task will be latkes and doughnuts.  Please feel free to share recipes – we’re on the look out for new ones, exotic ones, delicious ones, whatever you have  – you can email me at bshor@sweetandgoodcatering.com or you can post here in the comment section (if you’re the first commenter it says “no comments” – click on that and you can leave a comment). The basic recipe for latkes is easy – take a potato (sweet potato or root vegetable of your choice, sometimes zucchini) 2 eggs, add a little flour, a little oil, salt, pepper, maybe parsley or other spices of your choice and then fry it.  The important part is the frying, because once it’s fried, it’s delicious, and it’s almost sure to be a crowd pleaser.   The above picture is courtesy of Oregon State that…

We took some pictures of our cuban food (shocking, I know).  I will still need to get the black beans, vegetable paella, and the mojo chicken – but here are some of the exotic roots once they were peeled and cooked. First of all, how cool is it that I was cooking with one of the taro chips (again you can tell by the dots).  I peeled it and chopped it into chunks, and then, keeping with Cuban tradition – fried it.  Apparently, frying is a big thing in Cuba (one of the Cuban contestants on a cooking show had fried a very  nice cut of beef and was blasted for it). I put 2 inches of oil in the frying pan, and waited until the oil was *hot* before I started frying.  You have to be careful not to start frying with oil…

First, one of our eagle eye readers (Debbie S.) – found a website where there might be kosher kobe beef.  The company is called Stube Ranch, and it says they have some kind of kosher beef.  I’ve left a message and we’ll see.  Perhaps for the next Japanese special we’ll have real Kobe beef!  That would be exciting. Next, while we were in Israel, all of the Asian products were easily accessible.  Soybean paste (in a variety of colors), a variety of seaweed, everything was easily gotten at the shuk – not to mention all of the spices.  The truth is, we have found mostly everything here as well – except for the soybean paste.  But we know it exists – so next Japanese special we should be able to special order it (it is used for Miso soup). We found a new Asian market…